Embroidery Butterfly


This little butterfly is a free pattern by Mary Corbet. Check out all of her freebies and her great blog Needle n' Thread.
The design is simple back stitch in perle cotton, size 8.

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How Does Your Garden Grow?


Very well, thank you. The corn is up taller than the fence now! 
The cucumbers are running...and the tomatoes are hanging full! Just waiting for the tomatoes to ripen to a nice red color! Squash is coming in every other day, and the green beans have been picked twice already! The lima beans are loaded down, but not filled out enough to pick yet. The jalapeno peppers are abundant and have been picked once. The peas and okra are blooming and just beginning to produce.




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Marvelous Monday Motifs - 6/27/2011


You can read all about my idea for Marvelous Monday Motifs here. Today we have pages 19-20 of the J. F. Ingalls Company, 1886 Catalog of Perforated Parchment Stamping Patterns. 
Please NOTE: This catalog is not under copyright any longer; but the scanned version released to the public domain on 17 July 2007 (the source of my information) does come with restrictions. None of these designs can be sold. They are for your individual use.
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Easy Baby Slippers


 Aren't these the cutest! They are also quick and easy...and the pattern is free at New Conceptions.
Thanks to the ladies on my HGTV Message Board, Quilting and Needlework for posting a link for me to find! The pattern comes in sizes 0-3 months and 3-6 months...both in the same pdf file you can download. Here's how I made my little pair. First, I cut out the pattern pieces and glued them to cardboard (they last longer that way)...and I traced around them directly to the fabric. Then I stitched a wrap rose to the toe of each shoe.
Folded the heal piece over and stitched a seam about 1/2 inch from the folded edge to hold the elastic. Inserted the elastic and pinned.
Next, I stitched the edge of the elastic down and trimmed.
Then, I pinned one side of the heal to the outer toe piece.
And, pinned the other side too (hard to tell ...aren't you glad I showed you a photo of the first side pinned too!)
Pinned the inside toe piece on top...and now let's sew! BTW, I kept removing and re-inserting the pins as I added layers...so no sewing has been done yet. Here we go...sew straight across this pinned edge...about 1/4 inch from the edge.
Here's that seam sewn...and then the shoe turned so the entire top can be recognized.
Fold the shoe top and the sole in half lenghwise and mark the toe and heal centers with pins. Working on the underside of the shoe (see no flowers showing).
Match these pieces up at the pin marks...and pin all the way around.
Sew completely around...and then serge or zigzag the edges.
Then trim the excess off...see my little pile of "stuff" that I cut off the shoe on the right?
Lastly, turn the shoes right side out...and you're done!
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Flashback Friday 6-24

Was it a normal occurrence for a lady to have a bird? I'm not sure, but the image is one that would make a nice silkie, with embroidery added to the skirt, sleeves, and bodice. Color her with some pastel pencils...

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English Garden I, DYB Completed



My blocks have arrived home! And each is wonderful! These were NOT stitched by me...but by my swap partners. I sent each lady a simple English Garden image printed on silk fabric, with a cotton floral border. They were to embellish the image. Here's what each lady did...aren't they marvelous!
Arlene W. of Australia
Ingrid G. of USA (California)
Marya B. of USA (California)
Maureen G. of USA (Connecticut)
Meg S. of Uruguay
I think that each one turned out lovely. These were only small blocks, less than 8 inches square...but still each required a lot of stitching...and stepping out of a normal comfort zone of standard crazy patch enhancement. Lot's of French knots and beads were sewn down in such a small space...and I am very appreciative of the efforts of each wonderful lady!
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Vintage Butterfly Pattern

 Isn’t this a beautiful photograph! I love the delicate nature of the stitch design. It is the cover of the October 1918 Needlecraft Magazine.  At first glance, I thought the butterfly cloth to be a small doily…but, each butterfly measures over 9 inches wide! That would make this more of a table cover!

This magazine is one of many vintage documents available for preview at the antique patterns library. I encourage you to go check them all out. As I was reviewing this specific magazine, I saw that it included a photo of the original pattern and instructions. Here is the artwork included in the magazine…

and below I've re-typed the portion of the article that describes the butterfly…(I’ve tried to be correct in the way the author punctuated…and the sentences are long…)

QUOTE:
A Handsome Centerpiece for the Library-Table
By Marion Matthews
“The butterfly is a popular motif, always; and probably it has never been used to better advantage than in the decoration of the centerpiece illustrated. The colors are well chosen and effectively combined; although rich in appearance there is nothing about the work to hint of gaudiness—it is in the best of taste, and the centerpiece may well find a place in the library, living room or hall of any attractive home.
The butterfly measures nine and one-half inches from ti to tip of upper wings, and reminds one of the rare specimens sometimes found in collections, but never seen outside them unless in some tropical land.
The legs and antennae are outlined with black, in close, heavy stitch; body and wings are also outlined with black, but this is not done until the embroidery is completed. The upper part of the body is done solidly with black, as are the tips of the wings. Beginning with the lower part of the body, work the tip in satin-stitch with the darkest shade of golden brown; make the next bar of black, the next with a medium shade of golden brown, the next of black, next of yellow, next with medium brown and finish with the lightest shade of brown. Work the edge of the lower wings, between the lines that are to be outlined with black, with medium brown, taking stitches of this up into the black of the tips, inside the second line fill in the top with dark blue, leave a space which is filled with scattered French knots of yellow, make a narrow band of blue across the wing—outlined on both sides with black, as are all the bars save those across the body: leave a space to be filled with the knows, as before and finish with blue. The upper wings have the space between the lines, or the edge, worked with the darkest shade of brown, taking stitches up into the black tip, as before; two narrow bars of yellow, curved, cross the wing at even distances apart, and the spaces between these and the portion joining the body – also of yellow – are filled in with scattered knots of blue. At the base of the antennae two tiny circles are outlined with yellow and filled in with black. As a whole, the butterfly seems very real indeed. And is certainly a lovely creation of the needle.”
ENDQUOTE

I tried to re-draw the butterfly pattern for you.
 Hope you enjoy the pattern.
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Marvelous Monday Motifs - 6/20/2011


You can read all about my idea for Marvelous Monday Motifs here. Today we have pages 17-18 of the J. F. Ingalls Company, 1886 Catalog of Perforated Parchment Stamping Patterns. 
Please NOTE: This catalog is not under copyright any longer; but the scanned version released to the public domain on 17 July 2007 (the source of my information) does come with restrictions. None of these designs can be sold. They are for your individual use.
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Happy Father's Day





 Hope you all have a great Father's Day today. And, if you still are fortunate enough to have your Dad in your life...please give him an extra hug...and be thankful he is still there.


My dad was not one to give advice in a kind and gentle manner...as Jesus would do. He was more like John Wayne...direct and to the point...with a kind of "in your face" approach.


He only said things once...Once was plenty enough for you to get the point.


Miss you Dad!
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